How Differentiate Your Business By Learning To Tell A Better Brand Story

Content SmartsA great brand story will make you stand out from the crowd, increase brand awareness, create customer loyalty, and it will help you grow your business.

The question then is, how do we build a better brand story?

These are the questions we’re setting out to answer with branding expert Bernadette Jiwa, author of The Fortune Cookie Principle and writer at thestoryoftelling.com.

Join us as we discuss things like:

  • How a great brand story will make you stand out and increase brand awareness.
  • The critical questions you need to ask yourself before you can develop your brand story.
  • Help you determine the kind of value you want to deliver to customers. 
  • How to craft a better brand experience when you’re a service based business.
  • How the best businesses are built on reputation.
  • How to use content to build and grow your community.

Hit the flashplayer below to listen now:

 

(Duration = 26:30 | 25.4 MB)

Other ways to listen:

Show notes:

Bonus Book Giveaway!

I’ve really enjoyed reading Bernadette’s book. At the end of each chapter, she asks a series of questions that are designed to help you really think about what you’re in the business of doing. I really think it’s an essential read for any entrepreneur whether you’re a one-man business or running a team.

That said, I’m giving away 3 copies of Bernadette’s new book (via Kindle). Just answer the following questions in the comments below:

  1. What are you really in the business of selling? (If you’re in real estate for example, you’re not selling houses, you’re selling piece of mind to someone on one of the largest investments they’ll make in their lifetime)
  2. Name one thing you can start doing today to deliver more value to your customers.

 

Comments

  1. says

    Hey Ricardo!

    This was a fantastic podcast, I really enjoyed it! Branding and storytelling are such exciting topics, you and Bernadette must have had fun with this.

    I work for a large credit union in Birmingham, Alabama and we exist to support our community in many ways, not just financially. Collectively, the credit union industry strives to give consumers a choice as to where they conduct their financial business. We realize that at the heart of it, selling a checking account or getting another auto loan isn’t our goal. Yes, we need to make money, but we exist to support the community, in particular the underserved areas that want a voice in how their money is handled. We gain a lot visibility and business by simply being active and hands-on in the communities we serve through sponsorships, partnerships and of course favorable products and services.

    The idea that stood out the most in the podcast was this: “build a reputation for being helpful and caring.” That quote basically defines the credit union industry in that everything they do revolves around their members. While big banks must satisfy stockholders first and foremost, credit unions are owned by their members which effectively routes all the benefits to those that are directly invested in the success of the institution. That’s also one way credit unions currently deliver value.

    The second part of your question is a tricky one for credit unions. We all know that technology has opened up the playing field in the financial world. Mobile and payments are super hot right now, but not every credit union has the resources to offer these features to its members. Convenience is something credit unions have to start delivering on because it matters to consumers. Instant access to money, for free, from any device wherever you are in the world is an expectation now. Finding a way to make the credit union industry more innovative would make consumers take notice that credit unions are just as good of an option as banks are.

    I also find that credit union marketing/advertising is very predictable and outdated. I think this is a strong contributing factor to the lack of awareness and overall interest in the industry. Delivering great experiences isn’t the issue for credit unions, but following through with other aspects to complete the branding process would significantly alter how consumers perceive us. People want to trust and be proud of their financial institutions, but they can’t anymore. Especially with big banks. Credit unions have a huge opportunity on their hands and need to do a much better job with their branding. They already have satisfied members, now give them something to be proud of so they aren’t embarrassed to tell their friends about you! A little creativity and innovation would do wonders for the industry and most importantly for consumers.

    Thanks for sharing this, Ricardo and Bernadette. Great stuff as usual.

  2. says

    I really enjoyed this podcast, Ricardo. One thing I appreciate about today’s business is that entrepreneurs are encouraged to authentically tell their story instead of just selling themselves to the public. As a business writer, I’m very fortunate to be in the position to help others tell their stories. I recognize that not everyone is adept at using the written word to communicate their ideas, so I’m happy to be of service to help them do just that. I don’t just sell my writing. I sell the assurance that an organization or brand is getting their message across clearly, in a way that will benefit both them and their audience.

    As I was listening to the podcast, I felt prompted to be more authentic and open in the way I communicate with prospects. I’ve always felt the need to add a human, relatable element to my blog and other communications, but I wasn’t sure about how to go about this. I realized that it’s okay to share more of my personal experiences, struggles, and triumphs with my readers, because many of the people I want to reach share those things in common with me as business owners. I want them to understand that I know where they’re coming from, and I want to help them get to where they’re going. Not just to turn a buck, but because writing and helping people really are my passions.

    Thanks again for such a great podcast. I’m glad I tuned in!

  3. says

    That is a touchdown! Bullseye! I’ve noticed that feeling thing for so long. It is that enduring approach to remember. How do I, as a business, make people feel? That is so-soooo true. Powerful fleshing out of the ideas from Bernadette. Thanks for bringing this message to us, Ricardo.

    Question #1: In my business of marketing and graphic design, I sell them a personal friend who has connections to solutions for their marketing. Marketing is probably the most eclectic field of business, but I’m in the trenches and have connections and solutions and provide a peace of mind that they’re taken care of.

    Question #2: I can take a more proactive approach and through that I am communicating that the client has the best that is available to them today. I’m telling without telling that I’m on the cutting edge. And they are taken care of. Relax. Selling relaxation.
    ‘You do what you do best.’
    ‘I do what I do best.’

    Thanks again for making this great resource available to us, Ricardo.

  4. says

    I do hope our dear listeners learn poistive things from our group efforts as well other than the information that is being passed in our programs: that how a group of students start an effort, be it a chorus group or radio, only with their good intentions and on their own free time, and they manage to work together for so long, so nicely without disrespecting each other for their mistakes. I hope our audience notice these things as well rather than focusing only on our mistakes (which we sure would like to know about). There certainly is a more subtle and less sarcastic language that can be used in pointing out our mistakes, which I think will also be more effective and help us all learn from each other .

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